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Press release – NZ abortion committee ignores Down syndrome community concerns about lifting time limit on abortions for babies with disabilities from 20-weeks up to birth, and breaking Jacinda Ardern’s promise to the disability community

16 Feb Press release – NZ abortion committee ignores Down syndrome community concerns about lifting time limit on abortions for babies with disabilities from 20-weeks up to birth, and breaking Jacinda Ardern’s promise to the disability community

CONCERNED? PLEASE SIGN THE OPEN LETTER TO NEW ZEALAND PRIME MINISTER JACINDA ARDERN HERE

PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NZ abortion committee ignores Down syndrome community concerns about lifting time limit on abortions for babies with disabilities from 20-weeks up to birth, and breaking Jacinda Ardern’s promise to the disability community

Down syndrome advocacy group Don’t Screen Us Out have spoken out against the Abortion Legislation Committee’s decision to totally ignore the Down syndrome community’s concerns around the NZ Government’s Abortion Legislation Bill lifting time limit on abortions for babies with disabilities from 20-weeks up to birth.

A large number of those who made submissions to the Committee, including a submission from disability advocacy group Saving Down syndrome, voiced their concerns about the Bill introducing abortion right through to birth for babies with disabilities including Down syndrome.

Disability advocacy group Saving Down syndrome made the recommendation “that the Government ensures that the current 20-week time limit for disability abortions, including Down syndrome, is not removed by introducing a specific provision to the proposed law that clarifies that abortion for disability will not be permitted after 20-weeks.” This recommendation was totally ignored by the Committee.

Under section 187A of the Crimes Act there is currently a gestational time limit of 20-weeks for abortion for disability, providing two doctors sign off on the abortion.

The New Zealand Government’s new abortion bill, if it becomes law, will remove the current 20-week gestational time limit for disability. Instead abortion will be available for disabilities including Down syndrome right through to birth, under new grounds outlined in part one, clause seven of the Bill. This clause allows for abortion through to birth providing one registered health practitioner, in consultation with another registered health practitioner, reasonably believes that an abortion is appropriate, having regard to physical and mental health, and well-being. These terms are undefined in the Bill. The Abortion Legislation Committee has subsequently recommended that the “well-being” ground be widened to include “overall well-being” and this recommendation has been adopted by the Government.

In the handful of jurisdictions that have a similar clause allowing for abortion up to birth, this has in practice allowed for abortion for disabilities including Down syndrome right through to birth. The proposed New Zealand legislation in fact only requires one registered health practitioner, in consultation with another registered health practitioner, which could include two nurses, rather than the higher threshold of two doctors, for example in Victoria, Australia which has a similar abortion up to birth clause.

There have been over 1,600 abortions of babies with a disability under the stricter abortion up to birth clause in Victoria, Australia, since the law was changed there in 2008.

The Committee minority report from Agnes Loheni MP acknowledged serious issues with the Bill in regards to disability: “The Bill’s removal of current restrictions significantly widens the ability for a woman to have an abortion on the grounds of disability.” Unfortunately, this was ignored by the majority of the Committee which made no mention of disability concerns in their final report and no recommendations were made by the majority of the Committee to make changes to the Bill to take into account the concerns of the disability community.

In 2017 New Zealand Down syndrome advocates highlighted their concerns around Jacinda Ardern’s pledge to change abortion laws and that this would introduce abortion through to birth for babies with disabilities. In response Jacinda Ardern made a commitment to not increase the time limit for disability-selective abortion.

In response to the concern raised, Jacinda Ardern said:

“They have said till 40 weeks, which is wrong, which is wrong. We have time periods already set out in law, I’m not proposing changes to that. I’m proposing it comes out of the Crimes Act.”

The Government’s proposed change to the law could also see New Zealand fall foul of international disability rights obligations, as the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities has consistently criticised countries that provide for abortion in a way which discriminates on the basis of disability.

Already the majority of babies in New Zealand diagnosed with Down syndrome are screened out by termination and if this proposed policy became law it could put us on the path towards the situation in Iceland where 100% of babies found pre-natally to have Down syndrome are aborted.

Over 500 people with Down’s syndrome and their families have signed an open letter to Jacinda Ardern asking the Prime Minister to make a commitment to ensure that she does not break her promise, and that the Government either withdraws the Bill or urgently introduces a specific provision to the Bill that will ensure that abortion for disabilities will not be allowed from 20-weeks through to birth.

Lynn Murray, spokesperson for Don’t Screen Us Out and mother of daughter Rachel who has Down’s syndrome, said:

“The Abortion Legislation Committee has totally ignored the Down syndrome community’s concerns around the Abortion Legislation Committee lifting time limit on abortions for babies with disabilities from 20-weeks up to birth. They in fact recommend widening the grounds that will allow for disability abortion through to birth and this recommendation has now been adopted by the New Zealand Government.

Jacinda Ardern made a promise to the disability community ahead of the 2017 election that she would not increase the time limit for disabilities from 20-weeks. She should not break her  promise, by not only lifting the limit, but increasing it right through to birth.

This send a strong discriminatory message and a progressive New Zealand can do better for people with disabilities than introducing abortion up to birth.

Over 500 parents have signed an open letter to Jacinda Ardern from people with Down syndrome and their families asking Jacinda Ardern to make a commitment to ensure that she does not break her promise, and either withdraws the Government’s bill or introduces a specific provision to the Bill that will ensure that abortion for disabilities will not be allowed from 20-weeks through to birth.

It is vital that she follows through on her promise and ensures that abortion for disabilities including Down syndrome are not allowed after 20 weeks. Already the majority of babies in New Zealand diagnosed with Down syndrome are screened out by termination and if this proposed policy became law it could put us on the path towards the situation in Iceland where 100% of babies found pre-natally to have Down syndrome are aborted.”

ENDS

18 Comments
  • Stephanie Tucker
    Posted at 18:37h, 16 February Reply

    Totally unacceptable

  • Angela Howgill
    Posted at 19:10h, 16 February Reply

    Jacinda Ardern, you should be 100% ashamed of yourself

  • Stephanie Nunez
    Posted at 01:14h, 17 February Reply

    I cannot believe this

  • Brigid McArrhur
    Posted at 09:42h, 17 February Reply

    This is just WRONG!!

  • Roslyn
    Posted at 03:04h, 18 February Reply

    Because their life is precious.

  • Bernadette Maughan
    Posted at 06:21h, 18 February Reply

    Before anyone decides to have an abortion please do your research. Don’t believe just the negative hype the medics will give you. If you still go ahead with it, let it be a fully informed choice. DS is not to be feared.

  • Louise Yri
    Posted at 08:15h, 18 February Reply

    How can any health professional agree to such a brutal end to a Downes Syndrome child.A government that puts a stamp to this law will not receive my vote.

  • Marguerite Mora
    Posted at 12:48h, 18 February Reply

    These children are such a blessing. Please reconsider this proposal Jacinda Ardern.

  • Angela Voltz
    Posted at 12:51h, 18 February Reply

    BAD DECISION

  • Marilyn Cryer
    Posted at 00:20h, 19 February Reply

    Please add my signature to this list. I am against all late term abortions including Down’s syndrome and other disabilities.

  • John Bastiaens
    Posted at 01:35h, 22 February Reply

    Down syndrome children are happy children, we have five children, all quite healthy, but we would have accepted them if they had not been so! Every child has the right to live, wether healthy or not White or colored.

  • Jenny baker
    Posted at 06:37h, 23 February Reply

    This is disgusting , they are some of the most beautiful people in the world, our world would be much a sadder place without that extra chromosome I think it’s a happiness and joy chromosome, we have so much to learn from these beautiful loving joyful innocent people.

  • Beryl Anderson
    Posted at 19:12h, 24 February Reply

    Jacinda please don’t raise the abortion to 40 weeks

  • Myles Symons
    Posted at 21:15h, 24 February Reply

    I married my second wife who had 3 children, one with DS , he was six at the time now he is 16 and represents Australia in Athletics in the ii2 class , in swimming he beats most of the teens in his class at school with 1 first and 2 thirds.
    If I can accept and love this boy who brings more to this world that we need to learn then shouldn’t a country which prides itself on acceptance and diversity just except people with disabilities, in fact , just look past the difference and see the similarities, we are all human. Would hate to see what prejudices we see next cut out before birth or at birth- maybe brunette females that process life from the neck up – just saying. Not proud to called. Kiwi if this is who we have become.

  • Robin Ann Norvill
    Posted at 19:16h, 25 February Reply

    I have a niece with downs syndrome. She is a very precious young lady and has taught us all a lot about resilience and determination. She abounds with love. I thank God her parents didn’t choose abortion.

  • Gregory jackson
    Posted at 04:22h, 28 February Reply

    Absolutely disgusting that labour want to introduce this bill!

  • Frans Verhelle
    Posted at 20:04h, 28 February Reply

    I am working in Brazil with children with Down. I am director off three special schools in the state Bahia. I am terrified reading this news. We are terribly wrong eliminating children with Down.I studied the history of eugenics.We are provoking a new period off crimes against life itself. Why should we murder the innocent? Why can´t we protect the innocent against the cruelty off the so called normal people without ethics? We may not tolerate this nonsense.

  • Cathal Quinn
    Posted at 10:35h, 29 February Reply

    Every disabled or life limited child is a precious brother and sister to us all. People with disability, whatever it be, are still people, are still one of us, and,if let live, could love and be loved and bring out the very best in the rest of us, what makes us truly human – our capacity to love – and teach us tolerance. Acceptance of abortion for Down Syndrome or any other disability is surely the worst form of intolerance, and says to every person with disability fortunate enough not to have been screened out, “We may tolerate you, but we would prefer you weren’t here, you see, you really dont belong, you are not one of us, just a burden to us.”

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